Monday, November 15, 2010

WARSKYL: Unprofitable Home Defense, 10

6 comments:

Gravelbelly said...

I appreciate the cross posts. The issue has weighed on me for years. It's an evangelical taboo to mention it, though.

Neither pastors nor Christian school personnel nor home educators dare to mention that it's a sin against our children to put them in a godless educational system.

Thanks for joining me on that "radical limb".

The People's Will said...

This is nothing to do with this post I'm afraid, but I noticed you have Sunzi's 'Art of War' in your Amazon store. You may be interested in 'Han Fei Zi' (or 'Han Fei Tzu'), another Chinese classic from the same general time period. It's quite similar to Machiavelli's The Prince, and interesting for its perspective on statecraft, dealing with enemies and negotiating political situations. Unlike Machiavelli, though, Han Fei's ideas were successfully put into practice by Emperor Qin Shihuang, who united the warring states of China into the Chinese Empire. I warn you though that it contains passing references to homosexuality and polygyny. However, if you like Sunzi it's well worth a read.

The Warrior said...

Gravelbelly: Of course, why not? I'm already stuck out on the limb in all other ways pretty much. What's one more?

TPW: Okay, thanks for the recommendation, I really appreciate it! (Oh, and I extra-appreciate the heads-up for the content!) Thank you...I'm a big fan of The Art of War, and if Qin Shihuang put it into practice then I should probably know about it! Again, thanks.

Did you ever read Miyamoto Musashi by any chance?

Spencer

The Warrior said...

P.S. Oh, and thanks for checking out my store as well!

The People's Will said...

Sorry for late reply. My pleasure, always nice to be able to recommend books, particularly of this sort. I have to confess total ignorance to almost anything Japanese I'm afraid - so no, I haven't read Miyamoto Musashi. I take it it's along similar lines?

The Warrior said...

No worries, man! Musashi wrote a martial arts manual--mostly concerning kendo (i.e., fighting with Japanese swords--the long katana and a smaller wakizashi), but it's a great book period.

I love all military strategy manuals like that--the classics. I still need to read Clausewitz, and that copy of Frederick the Great's "Instructions to his Generals" is still beckoning....

Spencer